Pavel Acevedo is an artist, who specializes in painting and printmaking. Educated in traditional techniques like lithography, woodcarving and drawing.

Contact

951 425-1508

blackrelief@gmail.com

About

My formal art studies began at the Rufino Tamayo Plastic Arts Workshop in Oaxaca City while I was an assistant and student of the Lithography studio. In 2006, I enrolled to complete my Bachelor’s Degree in visual arts at"La Escuela de Bellas Artes/ Fine Arts School of Oaxaca where I studied under the guidance of prolific artists Shinzaburo Takeda and Raul Herrera. During this time I completed my education by taking workshops with artists such as Isis Rodriguez, Marietta Bernstorff, Inma Coll and Elvia Esparza. I was also an assistant in the print studios of Artist Demian Flores (Taller Grafica Actual) and Alejandro Santiago (Taller la Huella).

In 2010 I moved to Riverside, California and started getting involved in printmaking projects with a social justice and educational awareness in communities of color throughout California. In 2015, I opened my printmaking studio by collaboration with “The Desert Triangle Print Carpeta” located provisionally in Riverside. In 2017 I was commissioned by the Wignall Contemporary Art Museum to elaborate a permanent mural, which is located in Southern California.

My artwork has been exhibited in different group shows between Mexico and the U.S.  in public and private institutions as well individually: Rufino Tamayo Worskhop (Mx); Casa de la Ciudad Oaxaca (Max); Museo de Los Pintores Oaxaquenos (Mx);  Arte Cocodrilo (Mx); Plan B (Mx); Riverside Art Museum (U.S.); Mission Cultural Center (San Francisco, CA), Museum of Art El Paso(U.S.); The Mexic-Arte Museum (U.S.); Comalito Collective (US); College of the Canyons (US).

Artist Statement

The images that are first carved on a linoleum or wood plate and later printed on paper or painted on a wall are the result of a learning process that began in the printmaking workshops/talleres in Oaxaca city. My education was primarily in traditional techniques like lithography, woodcarving and drawing; in this period of time I found the portrait as subject for me to communicate with others. 

In 2010 I left Oaxaca and I moved to California. My artwork then took the relief print as a way to talk about my new home and life in the US and has also been a way to find myself in this country.

Through the representation of my surroundings, the portrait was both challenge and an appeal to me. The portrait turned into a portal where I can tell stories and try to find my language as an artist. Every portrait that I have carved or drawn has picked up stories of struggle, hope, highways, cities, animals, houses, protest, signs, injustice, malls, or even prehispanic glyphs. 

The power to exist between two cultures was no longer my goal; my purpose was now to create a third world, with other possibilities within my images and production. 

These images serve as a reminder of where I come from and to pay homage to culture and tradition, in a contemporary way. I let the faces inhabit new stories of struggle and perseverance, which exist among many others that have to be told.